JOIN US ON INSTAGRAM
CONNECT WITH US ON FACEBOOK

Who is taking care of our grandparents?

This is an archived article and the information in the article may be outdated. Please look at the time stamp on the story to see when it was last updated.

Let’s face it: America is not known for taking care of its elderly population. Americans are famous for other things, like smiling at strangers, getting heated at sporting events and talking to kids about college before they’ve even finished elementary school.

We might take care of our grandparents by setting aside money for Medicaid and Social Security. But unlike many other countries, it’s not custom to actually let them move back in with you.

Other cultures—notably, those in East Asia—put a strong emphasis on the importance of taking care of aging parents or other family members, so why is it an afterthought for so many in the West? The giant faction of baby boomers are now starting to become eligible for Social Security, so now it’s especially vital for the following generations to figure out how to support them, both financially and physically. As it turns out, some places in America are taking more action than others.

Using data from the most recent U.S. Census (2010), genealogy site MooseRoots looked at the number of seniors living with family and without family in each state. Seniors living in a “family household” means that they live with at least one other person related to them (by birth, marriage, or adoption). Those who live in a “non-family household” either live alone, with people who are not relatives, or in a senior care facility.

Arizona

Percentage of Seniors Living With Family: 69.9%
Population in 2010: 6.25 million

Georgia

Percentage of Seniors Living With Family: 70.0%

Population in 2010: 9.47 million

Texas

Percentage of Seniors Living With Family: 71.4%

Population: 24.3 million

Hawaii

Where Seniors are Living With Family in Hawaii | MooseRoots

Percentage of Seniors Living With Family: 74.3%
Population: 1.33 million

Utah

Percentage of Seniors Living With Family: 74.6%

Population: 2.66 million

Vermont

Percentage of Seniors Living Without Family: 35.6%

Population in 2010: 624,258

Maine

Percentage of Seniors Living Without Family: 36.2%

Population in 2010: 1.33 million

North Dakota

Percentage of Seniors Living Without Family: 36.2%

Population in 2010: 659,858

Rhode Island

Percentage of Seniors Living Without Family: 36.3%

Population in 2010: 1.06 million

District of Columbia

Percentage of Seniors Living Without Family: 45.7%

Population in 2010: 584,400

*Note: Because D.C. isn’t technically a state, the visual shows the kinds of households seniors living without family find themselves in, according to Census definitions.

Household Breakdown:

– Family: Householder” – Seniors who are considered the householder and are living with family
– Family: Spouse” – Seniors who are the spouse of the householder

– “Family: Family Other Than Spouse” – Seniors living with relatives other than their spouse

– “Non-Family: Householder” – Seniors living alone or with people who are not relatives

– “Non-Family: Non-relatives” – Seniors living with non-relatives

– “Non-Family: Unrelated Family” – Seniors living with an unrelated family