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Ikea to recall dressers after death of third child

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(Ikea)

NEW YORK — Ikea is recalling millions of dressers that can tip over and are being blamed for the deaths of three children.

The dressers have been known to fall over if they are not fastened to the wall, and the issue was already linked to the death of two toddlers that spurred Ikea to launch a repair program in July 2015.

“We are announcing this recall today given the recent tragic death of a third child. It is clear that there are still unsecured products in customers’ homes, and we believe that taking further action is the right thing to do,” the company said in a statement Monday.

There were no immediate details about the death of the third child.

Ikea said it’s been in “close contact” with the Consumer Product Safety Commission, which helps carry out recalls, about how to remedy the hazard. The CPSC declined to comment Monday evening.

Ikea would not confirm to CNNMoney what customers will receive under the recall, though the Philadelphia Inquirer reported full refunds will be offered.

Company spokesperson Mona Liss said details will be offered Tuesday morning.

The problem has been associated with several styles of dressers, though it was Malm chests and dressers that have been linked to at least two of the deaths over the past two years.

The company did not alter the product’s design or take it off the market following the launch of the repair program in 2015. The repair program provided new kits to attach the dressers to the wall for customers who hadn’t used the original hardware to secure the dressers.

Three other deaths linked to different Ikea dressers have occurred since 1989.

This is the latest string of bad news for Ikea. In January, a nonprofit slammed the company for allegedly “illegal and unfair working conditions” in factories that make kitchenware for Ikea and several other major retailers. A month later, European politicians accused the company of evading more than $1 billion in taxes, which Ikea denied.